GCSE Music (9-1)

SYLLABUS TITLE: Music J536

EXAM BOARD: OCR

Music is all around us. It influences our moods and emotions and stimulates us in many ways. Following this GCSE Music course will develop your understanding of how music is created through four Areas of Study. These provide focus and detail of specific areas of  music. In the course you will learn how to compose and develop skills in performing and appraising music. Musicians can go on to numerous careers beyond the world of Music, from Law to Medicine, as the skills required to be a good musician (creativity, listening, perseverance, team skills) are sought by employers from all walks of life.

AREA OF STUDY 1 – My Music.

This is a study of the candidates chosen instrument, which can include voice, DJing or sequencing. Candidates apply their understanding to the study of a piece which is within their capabilities and in a genre or style of their choice. They should then study the role of their instrument in it and techniques used to create the performance. This will then lead to the performance/ recording of the piece, and a composition to a brief written by the student.

Instrumental tuition is not part of class time and it is strongly recommended that all GCSE Music students should have lessons on their instrument or voice.

AREA OF STUDY 2 – The Concerto Through Time.

This is a study of the concerto and its development from 1650 to 1910 through the Baroque Solo Concerto, the Baroque Concerto Grosso, the Classical Concerto and the Romantic Concerto. Candidates will study the features of a concerto and how this developed and changed. They will need to study and understand how composers of concertos use musical elements and compositional devices in their concertos. This will be assessed within the listening exam and this unit may also inspire a second composition (written to a set brief).

AREA OF STUDY 3 – Rhythms of the World

This is a study of music from four geographical regions of the world:

  • India and Punjab
  • Eastern Mediterranean and Middle East
  • Africa and Central
  • South America

Candidates will study and develop an understanding of the characteristic rhythmic features of:

  • Indian Classical Music and traditional Punjabi Bhangra
  • Traditional Eastern Mediterranean and Arabic folk rhythms, with particular focus on traditional Greek, Palestinian and Israeli music
  • Traditional African drumming
  • Traditional Calypso and Samba.

Candidates will need to know the musical, cultural and technical features of each genre studied. This will be assessed within the listening exam and this unit may also inspire a  second composition (written to a set brief)

AREA OF STUDY 4 – FILM MUSIC

This is a study a range of music used for films. Candidates will study and develop an        understanding of how composers create music to support, express, complement and      enhance mood, atmosphere, characters and for dramatic effect. Students will develop an understanding of how composers use music dramatically and expressively through a       variety of musical elements and compositional devices. This will be assessed within the  listening exam and this unit may also inspire a second composition (written to a set brief).

AREA OF STUDY 5 – Conventions of Pop

This is a study a range of popular music from the 1950s to the present day, focussing on:

  • Rock ‘n’ Roll of the 1950s and 1960s
  • Rock Anthems of the 1970s and 1980s
  • Pop Ballads of the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s
  • Solo Artists from 1990 to the present day.

Candidates will study and develop an understanding of typical musical characteristics,   conventions and features of the specified genres.

This will be assessed within the listening exam and this unit may also inspire a second  composition (written to a set brief).

CONTROLLED ASSESMEMT:

this comprises 60% of the GCSE course.
Performance = 30%
Students must produce a performance for their own instrument and an ensemble performance. Together, these performances must last at least 4 minutes.
Composition = 30%
Students must also produce a composition for their own instrument to a brief written by them and a second composition based on one of the areas of study and to a brief set by OCR. Together these pieces must last at least 3 minutes.

EXAMINATION:

LISTENING AND APPRAISING – 40% of the total GCSE mark. (1.5 HOURS)
This will assess candidates’ knowledge and understanding of the content of Areas of Study 2, 3, 4 and 5

It is really helpful if you are able to have instrumental/vocal lessons during this course as you are not taught an instrument in class. Please discuss with Mr Lindsay as financial   support may be available.

It is expected that you will be a member of one of the school’s music ensembles as this will benefit your musical development and it is important to share your talent with the school community.

PROGRESSION AT POST-16:

Students can then go on to study  ‘A’ Level Music,  or BTEC Level 3 Music at RR6.

STAFF TO CONTACT:
Mr Lindsay (Head of Department)